Thursday, October 8, 2015

And now for something a little different.....

I feel like telling some stories....so whatever story pops up, that's the one I'll tell.  I'm sure there will be traveling and adventure mixed in.

FWIW, I'm home, working full time (5 days/40 hours a week full time), not getting to travel much (but will be soon), and back into normal routine.

A friend of a friend just posted an ultrasound photo of her horse's bun in the oven.  I tried to find some good photos via Google, but Google only believes in little baby human photos apparently, because it didn't matter what I typed into the search box, I got little tiny humans.

All that to say, it reminded me of my first days working on a farm in Texas.  I had just come from working on a small family farm in Wisconsin, with about 30 horses of all sexes, breeds, and ages from 3 months to 30 years.  This was the farm that my mare, Morganfee, and I first met on.  I was there for the birth of one baby.  So, it was quite a leap to go back to Texas and start a job on a 150+ head horse farm, with 30-50 babies a year.  The first weekend I was on my own, one of the guys who had been out feeding, comes in and says, "You need to come check on this mare, she's got something coming out of her."  It was fall, and none of the mares were due for several more months, so I ran out to the field, and sure enough, she was delivering.  I had one of the guys call the actual breeding manager (who thankfully lived just down the road), while I brought the mare in and tried to figure out what to do next.  Of course, the foal was stillborn, but what was amazing to me, was that even though the mare was only 7 months into her 11 month pregnancy, the baby was perfectly formed and beautiful.  She needed to be larger, and her hair still needed to grow more, but there was this beautiful filly lying dead in the straw.  I didn't realize that, much like humans (and probably most mammals) horses take form very early in the pregnancy, and then just need the extra time for all the details to develop.  But, also like humans, even in the first few ultrasounds, you can see the heartbeat (sometime after day 25 for horses, approx 6 weeks for humans, though the heart is developed by week 4-5).  This picture is the one that was posted to Facebook.  See the head in the upper L?  That's the leg coming across, of course.  This just a few months into the pregnancy, otherwise you wouldn't even be able to get this much in one shot.
Thinking baby horse thoughts today.....

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